Here are some of the places you can find information about allyship on the web!  Check back soon for even more resources!

Quicklinks:
Challenging Heterosexism and Homophobia | Challenging Cisgenderism and Transphobia
Ally Action Continuum | GenEq Website Resources | National LGBT Advocacy Groups

Challenging Heterosexism And Homophobia

Educate Yourself

»  Read newspapers or journals that feature LGBTQ news/issues

»  Imagine yourself to be LGBT or Q for the day

»  Attend a meeting of a campus group (listed at queer.berkeley.edu)

»  Listen to personal experiences had by LGBTQ people

Model Non-Heterosexist and Non-Homophobic Behavior and Attitudes

»  Take pride in your same sex friendships

»  Use inclusive language like “partner” rather than “boyfriend/girlfriend” or “wife/husband”

»  Foster a friendship with a member of the LGBTQ community

»  Show affection for people of all genders equally in public

»  Don’t make assumptions about another’s sexual orientation

»  Don’t assume LGB or T persons don’t have, like, or want children

»  Keep confidential information you have about others’ sexual orientations

Create an Inclusive Culture and a Welcoming Environment

»  Assume that some people in your circle and living center are LGBT

»  Assume that closeted LGBT people on campus are wondering how safe the environment is for them; provide safety by making clear you accept and support LGBT people

»  Put up bulletin board displays that include same sex couples or references to LGBT lives

»  Remember there is a heterosexual assumption, so actively advertise that LGBT people are welcome to any events that you organize, especially parties or dances

»  Say the words gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender out loud and not in a hushed whisper

Educate Others

»  Sponsor an educational workshop (see geneq.berkeley.edu/workshops).

»  Set up bulletin board displays on LGBT issues/culture/people

»  Have informal discussions with students in your residence hall, classes, groups, friends

»  Offer alternatives accurate information, etc. when you hear homophobic stereotypes or myths

Confront Overt Incidents

»  Interrupt heterosexist jokes, slurs, comments or assumptions

»  Actively react to anonymous anti-gay graffiti

»  Get support for yourself when confronting incidents

»  Make clear to all who are involved about both relevant policies and your own feelings

»  Provide support to that target/survivor of an attack

»  Critically review local media for heterosexual bias and call/write editors with complaints/suggestions

Take a Public Stand

»  Attend a rally or march supporting LGBT people

»  Sign a petition supporting LGBT equity

»  Promote LGBT non-discrimination policies

»  Campaign to work against discriminatory propositions and legislature

»  Join an organization that promotes LGBT equal protection and access

»  Form a support/activist group for heterosexual allies

Challenging Cisgenderism and Transphobia

Educate Yourself

»  Read transgender literature and transgender history

»  Read newspapers or journals that feature transgender news/issues

»  Imagine yourself to be transgender for an entire day

»  Attend a meeting of a campus group (all groups are listed at queer.berkeley.edu) and remain intentional about maintaining the space as one that is friendly to trans people and their allies.

»  Listen to personal experiences of transgender people

»  Familiarize yourself with UCB transgender resources

Model Non-Cisgenderist and Non-Transphobic Behavior and Attitudes

»  Take pride in your transgender friends

»  Use inclusive language and ask peoples gender pronouns

»  Foster a friendship with someone who is transgender

»  Show affection for people of all genders equally in public

»  Don’t make assumptions about another’s gender identity

»  Don’t assume that being transgender is just about liking to “dress up” or that their gender identity is the cause of a traumatic childhood

»  Don’t assume transgender persons don’t have, like, or want children

»  Keep confidential information you have about others’ gender identities

»  Use the same standards for transgender friends in terms of affection in public that you would use for cisgender friends

Create an Inclusive Culture and a Welcoming Environment

»  Assume that some of the people in your residence hall, classes, student groups, fraternities, sororities and co-ops etc. are transgender

»  Assume that closeted transgender people on campus are wondering how safe the environment is for them; provide safety by making clear you accept and support transgender people

»  Put up bulletin board displays that include transgender individuals or references to transgender experiences

»  Advertise T-Cal or other transgender services at your school or near your home

»  Post flyers announcing events of interest to transgender persons

»  Remember there is a cisgenderist assumption, so actively advertise at your events that attendees are welcome to dress and express their gender identity as they wish   

»  Find out about and share resources and information on transgender-affirmative service providers, events, bookstores, bars, etc.

»  Say the word transgender out loud and not in a hushed whisper

Educate Others

»  Sponsor a Trans 101 workshop for your organization, class, hours, hall etc.

»  Sponsor films that educate about transgender persons and experiences

»  Set up bulletin board displays on transgender issues /people

»  Have informal discussions with students in your residence hall, classes, groups, friends

»  Offer alternatives accurate information, etc. when you hear transphobic stereotypes or myths

»  Write articles for Daily Cal on transgender issues, write letters to the editor

Confront Overt Incidents

»  Interrupt cisgenderist and transphobic jokes, slurs, comments or assumptions

»  Actively react to anonymous anti-trans graffiti

»  Get support for yourself when confronting incidents

»  Make clear to all who are involved about both relevant policies and your own feelings

»  Provide support to that target/survivor of an attack

»  Critically review local media for cisgender bias and call/write editors with complaints/suggestions

Take a Public Stand

»  Display transgender affirming posters, signs etc. in your home/office

»  Attend a rally or march supporting transgender people

»  Write to the Daily Cal

»  Sign a petition supporting transgender equity

»  Promote transgender non-discrimination policies

»  Campaign to pass affirming transgender legislation or work to defeat discriminatory propositions

»  Join an organization that promotes transgender equal protection and access

»  Form a support/activist group for cisgender allies

»  Organize to get more resources on campus for transgender people

Ally Action Continuum

          -Griffin, Green, Harro

1.  Actively Participating      

2.  Denying/Ignoring                         

3.  Recognizing No Action                 

4.  Recognizing/Interrupting              

5.  Educating Self

6.  Questioning/Dialoguing

7.  Supporting Encouraging

8.  Initiating/Preventing

These are the eight stages of response described on this continuum.  The actions move from being extremely homophobic, transphobic or heterosexist, cisgenderist to extremely anti-homophobic, anti-transphobic and anti-heterosexist, anti-cisgenderist. These are the eight stages of response described on this continuum.  The actions move from being extremely homophobic, transphobic or heterosexist, cisgenderist on the top of the continuum to extremely anti-homophobic, anti-transphobic and anti-heterosexist, anti-cisgenderist on the bottom of the continuum. However, it is important to note that not everyone progresses through these stages at the same pace, and some may go through multiple stages at one time. Therefore, this continuum acts as a guide only, and is in no way representative of all ally experiences.

Actively Participating

This stage of response includes actions that directly support Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay & Transgender (LBGT) oppression.  These actions include laughing at or telling jokes that put down LBGTs, making fun of people who don't fit the traditional stereotypes of what is masculine or feminine, discouraging others and avoiding personal behavior that is not sex stereotyped, and engaging in verbal or physical harassment of LBGT's or heterosexuals who do not conform to traditional sex role behavior.  It also includes working for anti-gay legislation.

Denying or Ignoring

This stage of response includes inaction that supports LBGT oppression coupled with an unwillingness or inability to understand the effects of homophobic, transphobic, heterosexist, and cisgenderist actions.  This stage is characterized by a "business as usual" attitude.  Though responses in this stage are not actively and directly homophobic, transphobic, heterosexist, or cisgenderist, the passive acceptance of these actions by others serves to support the system of LBGT oppression.

Recognizing, But No Action

This stage of response is characterized by a recognition of homophobic, transphobic, heterosexist, or cisgenderist actions, and the harmful effects of these actions.  However, this recognition does not result in action to interrupt the homophobic, transpobic, heterosexist, or cisgenderist situation.  Taking action is prevented by homophobia, transphobia or a lack of knowledge about specific actions to take.  This stage of response is accompanied by discomfort due to the lack of congruence between recognizing homophobia, transphobia, heterosexism, or cisgenderism yet failing to act on this recognition.  An example of this stage of response is a person hearing a friend tell a "queer joke," recognizing that it is homophobic or transphobic not laughing at the joke, but saying nothing to the friend about the joke.

Recognizing and Interrupting

This stage of response includes not only recognizing homophobic, transphobic, heterosexist, and cisgenderist actions, but also taking action to stop them.  Though the response goes no further than stopping the action, this stage is often an important transition from passively accepting homophobic, transphobic, heterosexist, or cisgenderist actions to actively choosing anti-homophobic, anti-transphobic, anti-heterosexist, and anti-cisgenderist actions.  In this stage a person hearing a "queer joke" would not laugh and would tell the joke teller that jokes that put down lesbians and gays are not funny.  Another example would be a person who realized that she/he is avoiding an activity because others might think she/he is LBGT is she/he participates in it, and then decided to participate.

Educating Self

This stage of response includes taking action to learn more about LBGT, heterosexism, homophobia, transphobia, and cisgenderism.  These actions can include reading books, attending workshops, talking to others, joining organizations, listening to LGBT music, or any other actions that can increase awareness and knowledge.  This stage is also a prerequisite for the last three stages.  All three involve interacting with others about homophobia, transphobia, heterosexism, and cisgenderism.  In order to do this confidently and comfortably, people need first to learn more.

Questioning and Dialoguing

This stage of response is an attempt to begin educating others about homophobia, heterosexism, transphobia, and cisgenderism.  This stage goes beyond interrupting homophobic, transphobic, heterosexist, and cisgenderist interactions to engaging people in dialogue about these issues.  Through the use of questions and dialogue, this response attempts to help others increase their awareness of and knowledge about homophobia and heterosexism.

Supporting and Encouraging

This stage of response includes actions that support and encourage the anti-homophobic, anti-transphobic, anti-heterosexist, and anti-cisgenderist actions of others.  Overcoming the homophobia that keeps people from interrupting this form of oppression even when they are offended by it is difficult.  Supporting and encouraging others who are able to take this risk is an important part of reinforcing anti-homophobic, anti-transphobic, anti-heterosexist, and anti-cisgenderist behavior.

Initiating and Preventing

This stage of response includes actions that actively anticipate and identify homophobic or  transphobic institutional practices or individual actions and work to change them.  Examples include teachers changing a "Family Life" curriculum that is homophobic, transphobic, heterosexist, or cisgenderist, or counselors inviting a speaker to come and discuss how homophobia and transphobia can affect counselor-client interactions.

GenEq Website Resources

Off-Campus Resources | Men and LGBT | GenEq LGBTQ Workshops | When a Friend, Family Member, or Loved One Comes Out

National LGBT Advocacy Groups

Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD)
http://www.glaad.org/

Gay, Lesbian and Straight Educators Network (GLSEN)
http://www.glsen.org

Human Rights Campaign (HRC)
http://www.hrc.org/

Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund (LLDEF)
http://www.lambdalegal.org/

Lesbian and Gay Immigration Rights Task Force (LGIRTF)
http://www.lgirtf.org

National Gay and Lesbian Task Force (NGLTF)
http://www.ngltf.org

Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG)
http://www.pflag.org/